Art Entrepreneurship and it’s Importance

In an industry where you are your career and your name and reputation could win or cost you a job, there has been an uprising of entrepreneurial activity in the art and theatre world. A surge of web series, YouTube caricatures and original works have hit the scene and these are just among the few creations that have stemmed from the desire to create fresh and compelling art.

Entrepreneurship. What exactly does that mean? According to BusinessDictionary.com, it means “The capacity and willingness to undertake conception, organization, and management of a productive venture with all attendant risks, while seeking profit as a reward.” But what does this mean for you? Why is this important? According to the Institute for Arts Entrepreneurship, “Small businesses play a major role in the vitality of our economic landscape…they account for half of the United States private gross domestic product, employ more than half of all workers in the U.S alone, and have provided 60 to 80 percent of the new jobs in the economy. There is simply no reason that the arts cannot be a vibrant part of the development of rebuilding the future of America.” Your art is important and there is a desperate need for it, especially Christian art, from people of faith whose mission is to speak truth through their art.

In the field of theater and the arts, sometimes the only way to get work is to make the work yourself. We are basically selling ourselves and the process of creating your own work is an experience that is priceless. It is important to be a creator of art. Art that is your own and original because you have the ability to share your unique perspective and how you see and experience the world. I had the privilege of seeing Lina Alfinito’s one woman show, Confessions of the World’s Worst Missionary, at the Hollywood Fringe Festival (HFF). To be able to listen to her story and get a glimpse of her experiences was so incredibly raw and passionate that it moved me to tears. If Ms. Alfinito didn’t take the time and the risk of  creating this show, audience members at HFF wouldn’t have had the same experience I did. I wouldn’t have known, in the same amount of detail that this show provided, about the issues that are still prevalent in South Africa. There will always be a need for storytelling and it is important that we as students start telling our stories. Good stories. We have the power to move, inspire, or give some amount of clarity to just one person.

Although the desire may be, at first, to have an outlet for one’s creativity, the long term dream is to turn your hobby into your career. And why can’t you? There are thousands of people doing just that, some even coming from right where you are. APU. Check back later to read alumni interviews and success stories.

Check out more info at: http://blog.entrepreneurthearts.com/

Taylor Wesselman is the 2012 Production Intern. He enjoys writing musicals in the shower, long walks at Disneyland and his favorite vegetable is pizza. When not interning, he spends his time trying to find his shadow.

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